The hip joint is the largest weight-bearing
joint in the human body. It is also referred to
as a ball and socket joint and is surrounded
by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The
thigh bone or femur and the pelvis join to
form the hip joint.
Hip replacement has become necessary
for your arthritic hip: this is one of the
most effective operations known and
should give you many years of
freedom from pain.
This means that part or all of your previous hip replacement needs to be revised. This operation varies from very minor adjustments to massive operations replacing significant amounts of bone and hence is difficult to describe in full.
The knee is a complex joint which consists of bone, cartilage, ligaments and tendons that make joint movements easy and at the same time more susceptible to various kinds of injuries.
A Total Knee Replacement (TKR) or
Total Knee Arthroplasty is a surgery
that replaces an arthritic knee joint with
artificial metal or plastic replacement
parts called the ‘prostheses’.
Revision Knee Replacement means that part or all of your previous knee replacement needs to be revised. This operation varies from very minor adjustments to massive operations replacing significant amounts of bone.
Unicondylar Knee Replacement simply means that only a part of the knee joint is replaced through a smaller incision than would normally be used for a total knee replacement.

Blog

  • Benefit of preoperative exercise for post-TKR functional outcomes unclear

    According to study results, a median of 10 exercise sessions before total knee replacement demonstrated a small yet non-significant improvement in functional assessments compared with patient education only; however, benefits were not sustained after surgery, demonstrating inconclusive results regarding whether preoperative exercise was beneficial for postoperative functional outcomes. Researchers randomly assigned 45 patients awaiting total […]

    Read More

  • Routine gait analysis may be a helpful guide for post-TKA rehabilitation

    Many patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty did not experience improvement in their gait relative to preoperative patients by 12 months postoperatively; however, use of routine gait analysis was helpful for guiding patients’ postoperative rehabilitation and may be useful for developing strategies for mobility improvement, according to researchers’ findings. Using inertial measurement units, the researchers […]

    Read More

  • Canal-to-Diaphysis Ratio as an Osteoporosis-Related Risk Factor for Hip Fractures

    Prevention of osteoporosis is essential to health, quality of life, and independence in the elderly. The accepted diagnostic method for evaluation of fracture risk after osteopenia and osteoporosis is the measurement of bone mineral density with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). This method is limited because of its low accessibility, high capital costs, and low sensitivity. […]

    Read More

  • Detecting knee-cushion problems early could lead to better treatments

    Research could provide clues to causes of osteoarthritis Within the knee, two specialized, C-shaped pads of tissue called menisci perform many functions that are critical to knee-joint health. The menisci, best known as the shock absorbers in the knee, help disperse pressure, reduce friction and nourish the knee. Now, new research from the University of […]

    Read More

  • Walking on an incline could help people suffering from knee problems

    Incline walking on a treadmill could benefit people with knee osteoarthritis or knee replacements, says a new study from Ball State University. A research team led by Henry Wang, a Ball State exercise science professor, studied 15 volunteers at the university’s Biomechanics Laboratory to find that walking on an incline treadmill reduces stress on the […]

    Read More

FirstPrevious | Pages 16 17 18 19 20 [21] 22 23 24 25 26 of 26 | Next | Last
Tell a Friend
x
^ Back to Top